Basic Facts about Optometrists in the US

Optometrists are independent health care providers trained and licensed to examine, diagnose, treat, and manage diseases of the eyes as well as their assoc…

Optometrists are independent health care providers trained and licensed to examine, diagnose, treat, and manage diseases of the eyes as well as their associated structures. There are optometrists practicing in around 7,000 communities in the US. In some communities, they are the only primary eye care providers. These eye experts follow technological advancements to effectively address the evolving needs of their patients.

If you want to be an optometrist, you have to complete pre-professional undergraduate educational requirements, finish a four-year optometric professional degree program at schools and colleges accredited by the American Optometric Association’s Council on Optometric Education, and pass a national board examination. Though it is not required for licensure, some optometric graduates undergo specialized residency training programs before beginning their practice.

In terms of salary, optometrists receive an amount similar to that of physicians, dentists, and other health care providers. Income may be dependent on the type of practice setting—optometrists working in a private practice generally receive more than those who work for the government. Most optometrists can practice well over the usual retirement age, thus providing opportunities to create substantial retirement accounts.

Aside from prescribing residents in Indianapolis eyeglasses or contact lenses, optometrists in most states also assist in hospital tasks. Their services include evaluations of inpatients, emergency room assistance, and pre- and post-operative care of eye surgery cases. Optometrists also offer low vision rehabilitative care, as well as eye disease evaluations for diabetic patients.

The need for professional vision care services has escalated with today’s increasingly hectic lifestyles—more seniors develop age-related eye diseases, school children encounter vision problems early on, and modern diagnostic methods and treatments call for more expertly trained optometrists. Because of this demand and the fact that optometry is projected to be among the top thirteen careers in the next decade, an optometrist in Indianapolis or anywhere else has employment security.

Perhaps the best thing about being an optometrist in Indianapolis or any other locale is that one gets to improve other people’s lives. After all, vision deprivation can have negative economic, psychological, and social effects to those affected by it. With dedicated optometrists, however, visually-impaired individuals are given clearer sight, and in the long run, a better quality of life.